Chocolate Torte
Chocolate Torte
Design Blue
Design Blue
Dusty Blue
Dusty Blue
Burlwood
Burlwood
Sand Brown
Sand Brown
Powder Puff
Powder Puff
Jet Black
Jet Black
Chic White
Chic White
Excalibur Gray
Excalibur Gray
Tapioca
Tapioca
Angel Falls
Angel Falls

Plain Pathani Kurta Salwar with Thread Embroidery on Neck

Best Seller
FREE Delivery
$65

Crafted from Pure Cotton, this ensemble embraces comfort with a touch of regality. This ensemble has been adorned with delicate thread embroidery on the neck that weaves a tale of enchanting elegance. The meticulous embroidery not only graces the fabric but also narrates cultural stories with each thread. This attire is a symbol of simplicity merging seamlessly with sophistication, transcending mere fashion to embody tradition. Perfect for special and auspicious gatherings, this outfit is a manifestation of cultural pride and satorial finesse.

Chocolate Torte
Chocolate Torte
Design Blue
Design Blue
Dusty Blue
Dusty Blue
Burlwood
Burlwood
Sand Brown
Sand Brown
Powder Puff
Powder Puff
Jet Black
Jet Black
Chic White
Chic White
Excalibur Gray
Excalibur Gray
Tapioca
Tapioca
Angel Falls
Angel Falls
Color
Size
Quantity
Delivery Ships in 1-3 days
Item Code: SPD11
Specifications:
Pure Cotton
Dimensions
View size chart
Handmade
Handmade
Free delivery
Free delivery
Fully insured
Fully insured
Shipped to 153 countries
Shipped to 153 countries
More than 1M+ customers worldwide
More than 1M+ customers worldwide

A Pathani long Shirt and Pajama : an Ethnic Fashion.


Though a bit modified, especially the lower component – the legs’ wrap, from a traditional salwar to a Sutthan or dogri pajama which is provided with larger room around the legs, especially on ankles, this costume – a pair of shirt and pajama, is an ethnic fashion popular among some of the tribes of Central Asia and hill regions of India. Appropriated and tailored to the region’s climatic temperament – the shirt’s length in particular, these wears were the result of the interaction of these hill tribes with Europeans first during the First World War, and then during the second.


A well guarded buttoned and collared front, cuffed sleeves – often tight-fitted, and knee-down length of the shirt better protected the wearer against the region’s icy climate. Better to work with, that is, more appropriate as a working costume, and more economical this pajama with narrow leg-girths seems to have alternated all traditional fashions of sewn lowers as well as the European fashion of trousers.


The costume’s ethnic character apart it indexes the robust and vigorous manhood that a Pathan represents, and it is perhaps for such primitiveness that it is the craze of young ones around the globe. As a matter of fact not just its ethnicity this style of wear is seen manifesting a different character – straightforwardness, honesty, courage and simplicity, the characteristics of  a primitive race. Not necessarily a Pathan-like looking even those with average health or even less body weight are able to improve not only their figure but their entire personality with such costume fashion. Now a globally loved costume style such Pathani suits wearing young men might always be seen thronging and a night-club or a dancing hall.


Both shirt and pajama have been tailored out of a subdued and elegantly woven self patterned pure cotton textile. Except the knee-down extra length the shirt, as well as the pajama, have been crafted to normal dimensions. Besides a moderate collar, neither large nor small, a beautifully embroidered front band covering the inside band containing button holes and the buttons, is the most beautiful component of the wear. The band, a normal length and breadth, has been beautified with elegant design-patterns embroidered with the thread of the same shade.   The gradually downwards narrowing pajama is a live fashion used among Dongras, Himachali, people of Sind, Kashmir and other hill regions.


This description by Prof. P.C. Jain and Dr Daljeet. Prof. Jain specializes on the aesthetics of ancient India. Dr Daljeet is the chief curator of the Visual Arts Gallery at the National Museum of India, New Delhi. They have both collaborated on numerous books on Indian art and culture.

Add a review
Have A Question

For privacy concerns, please view our Privacy Policy