Natural Brass
Natural Brass
Gold
Gold

9" Vina-vadaka Ganapati In Brass | Handmade | Made In India

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Natural Brass
Natural Brass
Gold
Gold
Color
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Item Code: XO18
Specifications:
Brass Sculpture
Height: 10.00 inch
Width: 11.00 inch
Depth: 6.00 inch
Weight: 6.90 kg
Handmade
Handmade
Free delivery
Free delivery
Fully insured
Fully insured
Shipped to 153 countries
Shipped to 153 countries
More than 1M+ customers worldwide
More than 1M+ customers worldwide
This brass masterpiece, an exceptionally simplified form of the most innocent god Lord Ganesha, represents him fully enrapt playing on his ‘vina’. He has been represented as seated fully stretched over a rectangular thickly cushioned mattress with his legs folded backwards and thrown to left, and his ‘vina’ flying over them across like a bridge raised on its end-drums. Unlike most brass-casts polished to eye-blinding brilliance this statue discovers its magic and visual effects in its subdued buff and judiciously balanced dark and light zones along with all linear forms. This interplay of bright spaces and dark lines defining them, the form that they represent, attributes to the statue a painting like precision. Fully absorbed he seems to be producing a melody and the strings of ‘vina’ that he is vibrating seem to accompany it. His gently twisted right-inclining leftwards turned head, suggesting his absorption, but not excitement, reveals that the divine melody abounds in some deep mystique.

Not in his figure, body’s curves or twists, or the feet’s gait, the melody seems to have descended within transforming into deep divine quiescence defining, besides the bearing of his face, his entire being. More than any other dimension it is in its mystique, in its power to sublimate, to transport the mind into deep thoughtfulness, that the statue seeks its distinction. The statue represents Lord Ganesha playing on his instrument with his normal right and left hands, while holding his upper right, in ‘abhaya’ – gesture of granting freedom from fear, and upper left, carrying a conch. Strangely, this representation of Lord Ganesha, so fond of eating, does not incorporate ‘laddu’, his most favoured attribute, or even a mango or another fruit. The mouse, his mount, invariably accompanying him in most of his icons, is also missing. The only attribute that he is carrying is the Vaishnavite conch whereas Shiva’s son Ganesha is from Shaivite line. Except a trident mark on his forehead he does not have any Shaivite feature. The ‘vina’ is more often associated with Saraswati’s iconography. As Brahma’s consort Saraswati represents Vaishnava line, though sometimes she is also linked to Shiva.

This four-armed brass-image of Lord Ganesha, not holding any of his more usual attributes, elephant goad, battle-axe, or ‘laddu’ but just a conch, not his characteristic attribute, has been cast as sprawling on a large rectangular seat looking like a cushioned mattress. Raised on its end-drums he is holding the ‘vina’ over his legs and is playing on it with his normal two hands. He is putting on a richly adorned and elegantly pleated ‘antariya’ with a length greater than usual. Its extra breadth with lavish rich border lying scattered on the seat is exceptionally beautiful. Besides, he is putting on his shoulders and upper arms a rich sash, and on his neck, arms and wrists elegantly designed jewellery. He is putting on a majestic crown and has behind his face an elaborate halo. He has on his forehead a trident-like styled ‘tilaka’ mark besides the sacred syllable ‘AUM’ inscribed on the trunk’s top.

Broadly, the image of the elephant god has been conceived as single-tusked, an aspect of Ekadanta Ganapati, and pot-bellied, an aspect of Lambodara Ganapati, the two classical manifestations of Lord Ganesha, the former symbolising single minded devotion and zeal to undergo any sacrifice for his devotees, and the latter, symbolising immense treasures and oceans of knowledge that Lord Ganesha represented and bestowed upon his devotees. In his one tusked manifestation he accomplishes end of all dualities. Ekadanta Ganapati guides his devotees to right path, and as Lambodara Ganapati, he affords them all worldly riches and as also entire divine knowledge that leads to redemption.

This description by Prof. P.C. Jain and Dr Daljeet. Prof. Jain specializes on the aesthetics of ancient Indian literature. Dr Daljeet is the chief curator of the Visual Arts Gallery at the National Museum of India, New Delhi. They have both collaborated on numerous books on Indian art and culture.



How to keep a Brass statue well-maintained?


Brass statues are known and appreciated for their exquisite beauty and luster. The brilliant bright gold appearance of Brass makes it appropriate for casting aesthetic statues and sculptures. Brass is a metal alloy composed mainly of copper and zinc. This chemical composition makes brass a highly durable and corrosion-resistant material. Due to these properties, Brass statues and sculptures can be kept both indoors as well as outdoors. They also last for many decades without losing all their natural shine.

 

Brass statues can withstand even harsh weather conditions very well due to their corrosion-resistance properties. However, maintaining the luster and natural beauty of brass statues is essential if you want to prolong their life and appearance.

 

  • The best and simplest way to maintain a brass statue is to clean it at least twice a week using a soft cloth or cotton rag. This will prevent dust from accumulating on the surface. Dusting is especially important for outdoor statues since it is prone to dust accumulation much more than indoors.

 

  • Another way is to cleanse the statue with mild soap, warm water, and a cotton cloth. You must go to every inch of the statue and even to the crevices and cracks. After this, clean the article with a dry towel to wipe off pools of water left on the surface.

 

  • To give a natural shine and luster to the statue, you may apply coconut or olive oil using cotton on every portion. You can use a toothbrush to get to the small crevices but do not be too harsh. This will make the brass statue appear fresh and new with a polished look.


  • In case you have a colored brass statue, you may apply mustard oil using a soft brush or clean cloth on the brass portion while for the colored portion of the statue, you may use coconut oil with a cotton cloth. 

 

Brass idols of Hindu Gods and Goddesses are especially known for their intricate and detailed work of art. Nepalese sculptures are famous for small brass idols portraying Buddhist deities. These sculptures are beautified with gold gilding and inlay of precious or semi-precious stones. Religious brass statues can be kept at home altars. You can keep a decorative brass statue in your garden or roof to embellish the area and fill it with divinity. 

Frequently Asked Questions
  • Q. Is the statue hollow or solid ?
    A. Brass statues are made through a process of clay casting, hence are hollow. Whereas, panchaloha bronze statues are made through a process of lost wax casting, hence they are solid.
  • Q. Can I see the original photo of the product ?
    A. For original pictures of the statue, kindly email us at help@exoticindia.com.
  • Q. Can I return the statue ?
    A. All returns must be postmarked within seven (7) days of the delivery date. All returned items must be in new and unused condition, with all original tags and labels attached. To know more please view our return policy.
  • Q. Can you customise the statue for me ?
    A. For any customisation, kindly email us at help@exoticindia.com.
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