9" Four-Armed Lakshmi in Abhaya-Mudra | Brass Statue | Handmade | Made In India

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Lakshmi is the goddess of wealth and fortune. According to the pauranik legends, she was born out of the ocean of milk at the time of the churning. As she emerged from the ocean she captivated all who watched her. The devas and asuras, alike, showered her with celestial gifts. Among the gifts was the Vaijayanti Mala, that Lakshmi chose to put around the neck of Lord Vishnu, accepting him as her spouse. Lakshmi being the source of all material wealth is almost always represented in the colours of gold.

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Item Code: ER32
Specifications:
Brass Statue
Height: 9.5 inch
Width: 6 inch
Depth: 6 inch
Weight: 3.10 kg
Handmade
Handmade
Free delivery
Free delivery
Fully insured
Fully insured
Shipped to 153 countries
Shipped to 153 countries
More than 1M+ customers worldwide
More than 1M+ customers worldwide

Her four arms signify her power, to bestow upon her devotees, the four purusharthas: Dharma, Artha, Kama, and Moksha. In this beautiful golden brass statue the goddess is represented as sitting in Siddha Hastasana upon a circular lotus pedestal. She holds lotus buds in each of her rear hands. Her right hand is raised in blessing of Abhaya Mudra while the left is pointing downward in a gesture of giving. Immense wealth comes to those who are fortunate enough to earn the blessing of the goddess. Her statue should be kept inside the house. So the wealth remains within. 


An excellent brass-cast, absolute in anatomical modeling geometry dragged into for discovering angles, symmetry and all perspectives, and jewels-smith’s tools, for discovering details and its entire ornate character, the statue represents the four-armed Lakshmi, revered since Vedic days as the goddess manifesting riches, prosperity, accomplishment and sustenance, and as one who represented supreme beauty and absolute womanhood. The Rig-Veda has dedicated to her a number of verses under ‘Shri-sukta’ in which the great text – the head source of all scriptures, identifies the goddess as Shri – Lakshmi’s most popular other name, lauding her as the giver of abundance, fertility and plenty of food.


The great text perceives her as one possessed of large breasts full of abundant milk – the inexhaustible source of life, and above all the status of an independent divinity far different from her Puranic transform as the consort of Vishnu, a subordinate status. As suggests the anatomy of her figure, especially her well developed breasts further emphasized by the beauty of the stana-pata – breast-band, the artist has modeled his figure of the goddess on the Rig-Vedic line.


With far deeply rooted Vedic culture in South Lakshmi is in regular worship, enjoys an independent status on par with her status as Vishnu’s consort and has a number of shrines, or sanctums in various shrines, dedicated independently to her; in North, her worship is occasional and sectional. She is the universal goddess for Diwali rituals, and the every morning’s goddess for a trader who with a summary rituals such as lighting an incense-stick before a photo believed to represent Lakshmi’s vision, would commemorate Lakshmi before he began any commercial activity.


However, on Diwali, perhaps the greatest of all Indian festivals, every Indian, rich or poor, and irrespective of which section of the society he belongs to, makes offering to Lakshmi and worships her. Weeks’ long preparations precede Lakshmi-worship : houses are cleaned, renovated, white-washed and electrified for welcoming Lakshmi who is believed to grace by her presence only a house that cleanliness sanctifies, though once she inhabits it she shall bless it for the entire year unless the household defiles it by any foul deed.


The statue represents the goddess in one of her most sacred four-armed manifestations holding lotuses in her two upper hands, the normal right being held in ‘abhaya’ – granting freedom from fear, and the normal left, in ‘varad’ – accomplishment of all desired. The upper hands symbolise the unmanifest source of divine energy that the goddess inherently draws from unseen zones, within her and without.


This divine energy is both, protective and procreative, the two essential roles that the goddess accomplishes and her normal ‘abhaya’ and ‘varad’ granting two hands represent, that is, what she draws by her upper two hands she puts into use by the normal two. Further, representing five cosmic elements : earth, water, fire, air and space, the lotus symbolises cosmos that held in the divine hands is upheld and sustained – the essence of Lakshmi’s being. Cast as lotus seated covering the lotus in full she has been represented as pervading the cosmos, and the symbolic lotuses on her palms and the upwards facing lotus feet suggest that she herself is the cosmos.


Apart that the image is a contemporary work, exceptional in its aesthetic merit, craftsmanship, anatomical proportions and modeling, fine details and image quality the statue classes with great master-pieces of all times. It breathes the sacredness that a sanctum image does but at the same time also the essence of tradition. Not merely its sharp features : thoughtful eyes, arched eye-brows rising from nose-line, sharp nose and cute lips proportionately aligned to the nose above and the chin below, the chin itself finely modeled, a well defined neck and glowing forehead and cheeks, all combined into a rhythm, the image, just nine inches tall, is amazing in discovering the minutest details.


The modeling of breasts breathes a bit of sensualism but with sublimity enshrining her face this too transforms into the universal motherhood symbolic of the timeless divine will to feed and sustain. The image is exceptional in its ornate quality, in details of ornaments, towering Vaishnava crown, large kundalas, breast-band, neck-ornaments, armlets, waistband and the decorative lace laid over her legs in particular, carefully executed ‘antariya’ – lower wear, hair and halo and the anatomy of her figure conceived in every exactness adhering to the model as defined in classical treatises related to Indian aesthetics.

Unveiling the Divine: Exploring the Symbolism and Significance of Lakshmi

Lakshmi Devi is one of the principal Goddesses in Hinduism. In the Vaishnava tradition, especially the Sri Vaishnava Sampradaya, Vishnu and Lakshmi are considered the Supreme or Absolute Truth. Mother Lakshmi is known as the Goddess of fortune who blesses the living entities in the material world with material wealth and prosperity. Our Vedic scriptures mention that Lakshmi Ji is the eternal consort of Lord Vishnu who is the Supreme Personality of Godhead. He maintains and controls everything in the material and spiritual world. Goddess Lakshmi is also His internal potency and is thus always engaged in the loving devotional service of the Lord in His spiritual abode Vaikuntha, a place where there is no misery.

The transcendental form of Mother Lakshmi is extremely beautiful. She is the emblem of beauty and mercy. She sees every individual soul as her own child and whoever approaches her with faith and devotion, certainly gets the mercy of Lakshmi Devi. She is often depicted wearing a red saree and holding different items in her four arms. She holds a lotus flower in each of her two upper arms. With one of her lower hands, she holds a pot full of gold coins (representing wealth) while the other hand stays in a mudra that signifies charity.
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Can we keep a Lakshmi statue at home?

As stated earlier, Lakshmi Ji bestows good fortune upon her devotees and takes care of them. She is full of compassion and therefore accepts anyone who comes to her even with ulterior motives. However, she not only gives material wealth to her devotees but those who approach her to know the real goal of human life or to know about the Absolute Truth, she blesses them with spiritual wealth (wisdom and mercy) by which they can come to a higher platform and consciousness. Thus, it is only by the mercy of Goddess Lakshmi that a living entity starts its spiritual journey toward Lord Vishnu.

If you want to attract this special mercy, you can keep the deity of Goddess Lakshmi at your home and worship her every day with an attitude of surrender. By doing so, you will develop a personal relationship with her and you will be able to experience transcendental happiness.
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Which Lakshmi idol is good for home?

Lakshmi Devi expands herself into eight major forms (Ashta Lakshmi) that are Dhana Lakshmi, Dhanya Lakshmi, Gaja Lakshmi, Sanatana Lakshmi, Dhairya Lakshmi, Vijaya Lakshmi, Vidya Lakshmi, and Aishwarya Lakshmi. You can keep any of the forms of Lakshmi in your home to bring material and spiritual auspiciousness. However, if you want her ultimate mercy, you may keep the deity of Goddess Lakshmi along with her master, Lord Vishnu.
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Which material is good for Lakshmi idol?

The idol or deity of Goddess Lakshmi comes in various materials such as brass, wood, marble, copper, bronze, etc. If you are planning to keep a deity of Lakshmi Devi at your home, the best material would be either brass or marble. Brass is known for its exquisite appearance resembling gold and is also a strong material. Marble is preferred by most people because it lasts longer than any other material.

How to keep a Brass statue well-maintained?


Brass statues are known and appreciated for their exquisite beauty and luster. The brilliant bright gold appearance of Brass makes it appropriate for casting aesthetic statues and sculptures. Brass is a metal alloy composed mainly of copper and zinc. This chemical composition makes brass a highly durable and corrosion-resistant material. Due to these properties, Brass statues and sculptures can be kept both indoors as well as outdoors. They also last for many decades without losing all their natural shine.

 

Brass statues can withstand even harsh weather conditions very well due to their corrosion-resistance properties. However, maintaining the luster and natural beauty of brass statues is essential if you want to prolong their life and appearance.

 

  • The best and simplest way to maintain a brass statue is to clean it at least twice a week using a soft cloth or cotton rag. This will prevent dust from accumulating on the surface. Dusting is especially important for outdoor statues since it is prone to dust accumulation much more than indoors.

 

 

  • To give a natural shine and luster to the statue, you may apply coconut or olive oil using cotton on every portion. You can use a toothbrush to get to the small crevices but do not be too harsh. This will make the brass statue appear fresh and new with a polished look.


  • In case you have a colored brass statue, you may apply mustard oil using a soft brush or clean cloth on the brass portion while for the colored portion of the statue, you may use coconut oil with a cotton cloth. 

 

Brass idols of Hindu Gods and Goddesses are especially known for their intricate and detailed work of art. Nepalese sculptures are famous for small brass idols portraying Buddhist deities. These sculptures are beautified with gold gilding and inlay of precious or semi-precious stones. Religious brass statues can be kept at home altars. You can keep a decorative brass statue in your garden or roof to embellish the area and fill it with divinity. 

Frequently Asked Questions
  • Q. Is the statue hollow or solid ?
    A. Brass statues are made through a process of clay casting, hence are hollow. Whereas, panchaloha bronze statues are made through a process of lost wax casting, hence they are solid.
  • Q. Can I see the original photo of the product ?
    A. For original pictures of the statue, kindly email us at help@exoticindia.com.
  • Q. Can I return the statue ?
    A. All returns must be postmarked within seven (7) days of the delivery date. All returned items must be in new and unused condition, with all original tags and labels attached. To know more please view our return policy.
  • Q. Can you customise the statue for me ?
    A. For any customisation, kindly email us at help@exoticindia.com.
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