30" Goddess Deeplakshmi In Brass

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This large size sculpture represents a damsel carrying a metal pan meant for a lamp and is popularly known as Deepa Lakshmi. It was around the later half of the 16th century that the DeepaLakshmi statues came into being. The earliest of these statues were conceived at Vijayanagara and Madurai and were in no time a popular artifact of Nayak and Vijayanagara art styles of South India and a little after of Indian art. They were cast both in metal and clay. These statues were votive images conceived for Diwali Pooja and with their lamps kindled were used as auspicious motifs to be worshipped along with Lakshmi, the presiding deity of the Deepawali festival, and Ganesha who removed all obstacles. Initially, such statues were gifted to patrons but later they were also sold like other artifacts both for gifts and personal use.

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Item Code: XM03
Specifications:
Brass Sculpture
Height: 30 inch
Width: 10 inch
Depth: 10 inch
Weight: 15.40 kg
Handmade
Handmade
Free delivery
Free delivery
Fully insured
Fully insured
Shipped to 153 countries
Shipped to 153 countries
More than 1M+ customers worldwide
More than 1M+ customers worldwide

Deepalakshmi statues, both in Vijayanagara and Nayak styles, were cast with great minute details, sharp features with a blissful composure on face, tall figure, a moderate size pan in hands worthy of use as a lamp and were highly embellished and bejewelled. In Nayak style, however, the lower garment of the figure rose from the foot up to breasts, whereas in Vijayanagara it terminated on waist. The upper parts of the figure were wide and large covered only by ornaments. The figure did not use a crown though her hair were beautifully and crown-like dressed. Deepalakshmi was initially conceived as a damsel and as such with just two hands carrying a lamp-like pan, but later the figure was also cast with multiple hands, four, six, eight or ten and with as many pans. This statue is obviously in Vijayanagara style.

The word Deepalakshmi sounds like one of the several forms of the scriptural Indian deity Lakshmi, or Mahalakshmi, the consort of Vishnu, but save the name this icon hasn't any scriptural basis or even a reference in ancient Indian texts. Lakshmi has a scriptural tradition of her origin from the churning of ocean and of her ten forms most of which she adopted as Vishnu's consort and obviously along with his incarnations, more significantly as Kamalodbhava with Vamanavatara, Bhumi with Parasuramasvatara, Sita with Ramavatara and Rukmani with Krishnavatara. None of these ten forms is Deepalakshmi. The Lakshmi concept, however, did not remain restricted to texts alone. In the course of time Lakshmi cult came to be more or less a tradition of faith, something between scriptures and folk, and was widely inclusive of things or entities that had its character.

In popular faith Lakshmi is worshipped since ancient days as the goddess of riches, prosperity and fertility. Hence, the term Lakshmi is now for ages commonplace for anything or any person which or who effects prosperity or weal. It has been for such reasons that even a cow, and sometimes even cow-dung have been revered in Indian tradition as forms of Lakshmi for they both instrumented riches and fertility. Lakshmi of the house is the most commonly used epithet for a daughter and daughter-in-law. The Deepalakshmi statue, as an auspicious votive artefact, is in the same way an expansion of Lakshmi cult for this too is an auspicious motif aimed at bringing prosperity and riches and is, thus, an artistic transformation or expansion of the ancient Lakshmi concept itself. .

This description by Prof. P.C. Jain and Dr. Daljeet. Prof. Jain specializes on the aesthetics of literature and is the author of numerous books on Indian art and culture. Dr. Daljeet is the curator of the Miniature Painting Gallery, National Museum, New Delhi. They have both collaborated together on a number of books.



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How to keep a Brass statue well-maintained?


Brass statues are known and appreciated for their exquisite beauty and luster. The brilliant bright gold appearance of Brass makes it appropriate for casting aesthetic statues and sculptures. Brass is a metal alloy composed mainly of copper and zinc. This chemical composition makes brass a highly durable and corrosion-resistant material. Due to these properties, Brass statues and sculptures can be kept both indoors as well as outdoors. They also last for many decades without losing all their natural shine.

 

Brass statues can withstand even harsh weather conditions very well due to their corrosion-resistance properties. However, maintaining the luster and natural beauty of brass statues is essential if you want to prolong their life and appearance.

 

  • The best and simplest way to maintain a brass statue is to clean it at least twice a week using a soft cloth or cotton rag. This will prevent dust from accumulating on the surface. Dusting is especially important for outdoor statues since it is prone to dust accumulation much more than indoors.

 

 

  • To give a natural shine and luster to the statue, you may apply coconut or olive oil using cotton on every portion. You can use a toothbrush to get to the small crevices but do not be too harsh. This will make the brass statue appear fresh and new with a polished look.


  • In case you have a colored brass statue, you may apply mustard oil using a soft brush or clean cloth on the brass portion while for the colored portion of the statue, you may use coconut oil with a cotton cloth. 

 

Brass idols of Hindu Gods and Goddesses are especially known for their intricate and detailed work of art. Nepalese sculptures are famous for small brass idols portraying Buddhist deities. These sculptures are beautified with gold gilding and inlay of precious or semi-precious stones. Religious brass statues can be kept at home altars. You can keep a decorative brass statue in your garden or roof to embellish the area and fill it with divinity. 

Frequently Asked Questions
  • Q. Is the statue hollow or solid ?
    A. Brass statues are made through a process of clay casting, hence are hollow. Whereas, panchaloha bronze statues are made through a process of lost wax casting, hence they are solid.
  • Q. Can I see the original photo of the product ?
    A. For original pictures of the statue, kindly email us at help@exoticindia.com.
  • Q. Can I return the statue ?
    A. All returns must be postmarked within seven (7) days of the delivery date. All returned items must be in new and unused condition, with all original tags and labels attached. To know more please view our return policy.
  • Q. Can you customise the statue for me ?
    A. For any customisation, kindly email us at help@exoticindia.com.
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