Subscribe for Newsletters and Discounts
Be the first to receive our thoughtfully written
religious articles and product discounts.
Your interests (Optional)
This will help us make recommendations and send discounts and sale information at times.
By registering, you may receive account related information, our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
.
By subscribing, you will receive our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. All emails will be sent by Exotic India using the email address info@exoticindia.com.

Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
|6
Sign In  |  Sign up
Your Cart (0)
Best Deals
Share our website with your friends.
Email this page to a friend
Books > Buddhist > Language & Literature > The Tibetan Vinaya: Guide to Buddhist Conduct – By The Venerable Khenchen Thrangu Rinpoche Geshe Rabjam and Abbot of Rumtek Monastery
Subscribe to our newsletter and discounts
The Tibetan Vinaya: Guide to Buddhist Conduct – By The Venerable Khenchen Thrangu Rinpoche Geshe Rabjam and Abbot of Rumtek Monastery
The Tibetan Vinaya: Guide to Buddhist Conduct – By The Venerable Khenchen Thrangu Rinpoche Geshe Rabjam and Abbot of Rumtek Monastery
Description
From the Jacket

Traditionally for the proper situation to arise and would give a teaching on that particular situation. Since this time, the world has changed. For example, in Buddha’s day all ordinary persons slept on straw mats on the floor and only kings and, the Buddhist teachings are divided into three major division: the Sutras, the Vinaya, and the Abhidharma. The Vinaya are the discourses of the Buddha on the con- duct of the monks and nuns and also lay persons.

The Buddha taught the Vinaya to monks and nuns so that they had a set of rules allowing them to devote their complete energy to reaching enlightenment. The Buddha, however, did not simply one day give these rules. Rather he waited wealthy merchants slept on beds. So one of the rules of the Vinaya is that monks and nuns could not sleep in a high bed. Clearly, today when almost everyone sleeps in a bed, this prohibition seems antiquated.

Thrangu Rinpoche, is eminently qualified for explaining the Vinaya and Buddhist conduct because he has lived since the age of four in a monastic situation. Thrangu Rinpoche has maintained his vows and was asked to become abbot of Gampo Abbey, one of the few Tibetan monasteries in North America. These teachings are Rinpoch"s detailed explanation of this poorly understood part of the Buddhist cannon.

Foreword

Traditionally, the Buddhist teachings are divided into three major divisions called the Tripitaka. The Tripitaka consists of the Sutras, the Vinaya, and the Abhidharma. The Sutras are the actual discourses of the Buddha, the Vinaya are the discourses of the Buddha on the conduct of the monks and nuns and also lay persons, and the Abhidharma is a complex classification of Buddhist concepts.

Reading through the discourses of the Buddha, one discovers that he was followed by thousands arid thousands of monks and some nuns. These ordained individuals wanted to engage in the task of reaching enlightenment without being encumbered by family or worrying about livelihood. The Buddha taught these individuals a set of rules which became the Vinaya so that they could devote their complete energy to reaching enlightenment. The Buddha, however, did not simply one day say that these are the rules for ordained persons. Rather he waited for the proper -situation to arise and would give a teaching on that situation. For example, one day some of his students reported that his monks, who were not allowed to have very many possessions, were raking their begging bowls and making these our of precious woods and embroidering them with precious jewels. The Buddha then gave a short teaching in which he said that monks should not embellish their begging bowls. This went on throughout the Buddha’s lifetime and after the Buddha passed away, all these rules for the sangha were collected together and these were systematize into over 200 rules which came to be known as the Vinaya.

Since this time, the world has changed and there have been occasional calls for changing these rules of the Vinaya.

For example, in Buddha’s day all ordinary persons slept on straw mats on the floor and only kings and wealthy merchants slept on beds. So one of the rules of the Vinaya is that monks and nuns could not sleep in a high bed. Clearly, today when almost everyone sleeps in a bed, this prohibition seems antiquated. Yet, when there has been a call to modernize the Vinaya, the Buddhist has almost always chosen to remain with the original rules of the Vinaya and to interpret these rules in a modified fashion. This interpretation of the rules is not just a practice of convenience, because deciding what is proper and what is improper is always made by highly evolved individuals who follow the criteria carefully laid out by the Buddha for deciding whether an act results in positive or negative karma.

To determine whether an action will produce negative karma it has to meet the four-fold criteria of basis, motivation, action, and final result. For example, for something to create negative karma that comes from stealing (a) the basis is that what is taken belongs to another, (b) the motivation is that one wants to deliberately take it, (c) the actions is that one actually takes it, and (d) the final result is that it is actually taken.

The author of this teaching, Thrangu Rinpoche, is eminently qualified for explaining the Vinaya and Buddhist conduct because he has lived since the age of four in a monastic situation. More recently he had spent seventeen years at Rumtek monastery in Sikkim at his Holiness Karmapa’s monastery teaching the major Tulkus of the Kagyu Lineage of Tibetan Buddhism. Thrangu Rinpoche has maintained the his vows and was asked by Trungpa Rinpoche to become abbot of Gampo Abbey which is one of the few Tibetan monasteries in North America.

In August 1985 Thrangu Rinpoche visited Gampo Abbey for the first time and gave a seminar on monastic discipline. Rinpoche gave the first set of talks to a group of twenty people assembled with Sonam Palden translating.

These eight talks were on the pratimoksha precepts. These were edited by Thelma Habgood published in Number 5 and 6 of The Profound Path of Peace which is the official journal of the International Kagyu Sangha Association Thrangu Rinpoche then gave another series of talks to Gampo Abbey in 1988 and these talks were on the Three Vows. We have combined these talks into one book. The second set of teaching was a set of five talks given at Gampo Abbey in May of 1988 on the three vows and translated by Chojor Radha.

We would like to thank The Profound Path of Peace for publishing these talks and felt that for them to reach a wider audience, Namo Buddha Publications would combine the talks into a single volume. Anyone interested in subscribing in The Profound Path of Peace which will continue to publish talks by Thrangu Rinpoche and other great lamas can write to The Profound Path of Peace, Gampo Abbey, Pleasant Bay, Nova Scotia, Canada BOB 2P0.

Anyone wanting to know more about the activities or the programs or publications of Thrangu Rinpoche should contact the Namo Buddha Seminar, 1390 Kalmia Avenue, Boulder, CO 80304-18 13. Phone: (303) 449-6608.

Content

Forword 3
1. The Pratimoksha Precepts 7
2. Discipline and the Precepts 15
3. The Vow of Individual Liberation 21
4. Karma and the Accumulation of Merit 27
5. The Outer, Inner, and Secret Pratimoksha 35
6. Nine Aspects of a Noble Being 43
7. Three Aspects of the Bodhisattva Vow 49
8. The Five Classes of Vajrayana Precepts 55
9. The Vows of the Three Yanas 63
10. The Vows of the Shravakas 71
11. The Vows of the Bodhisattva 83
12. The Vows of the Vajrayana 93
13. The Samaya Vow 101
14. This is my Monastery 109
15. Glossary of Terms 113
Glossary of Tibetan Terms 125
Bibliography 129
Khenchen Thrangu, Rinpoche 131

The Tibetan Vinaya: Guide to Buddhist Conduct – By The Venerable Khenchen Thrangu Rinpoche Geshe Rabjam and Abbot of Rumtek Monastery

Deal 20% Off
Item Code:
NAC245
Cover:
Hardcover
Edition:
1998
ISBN:
8170305713
Size:
8.8 Inch X 5.8 Inch
Pages:
132
Other Details:
Weight of the Book: 300 gms
Price:
$21.00
Discounted:
$16.80   Shipping Free
You Save:
$4.20 (20%)
Be the first to rate this product
Add to Wishlist
Send as e-card
Send as free online greeting card
The Tibetan Vinaya: Guide to Buddhist Conduct – By The Venerable Khenchen Thrangu Rinpoche Geshe Rabjam and Abbot of Rumtek Monastery
From:
Edit     
You will be informed as and when your card is viewed. Please note that your card will be active in the system for 30 days.

Viewed 7733 times since 25th Jun, 2019
From the Jacket

Traditionally for the proper situation to arise and would give a teaching on that particular situation. Since this time, the world has changed. For example, in Buddha’s day all ordinary persons slept on straw mats on the floor and only kings and, the Buddhist teachings are divided into three major division: the Sutras, the Vinaya, and the Abhidharma. The Vinaya are the discourses of the Buddha on the con- duct of the monks and nuns and also lay persons.

The Buddha taught the Vinaya to monks and nuns so that they had a set of rules allowing them to devote their complete energy to reaching enlightenment. The Buddha, however, did not simply one day give these rules. Rather he waited wealthy merchants slept on beds. So one of the rules of the Vinaya is that monks and nuns could not sleep in a high bed. Clearly, today when almost everyone sleeps in a bed, this prohibition seems antiquated.

Thrangu Rinpoche, is eminently qualified for explaining the Vinaya and Buddhist conduct because he has lived since the age of four in a monastic situation. Thrangu Rinpoche has maintained his vows and was asked to become abbot of Gampo Abbey, one of the few Tibetan monasteries in North America. These teachings are Rinpoch"s detailed explanation of this poorly understood part of the Buddhist cannon.

Foreword

Traditionally, the Buddhist teachings are divided into three major divisions called the Tripitaka. The Tripitaka consists of the Sutras, the Vinaya, and the Abhidharma. The Sutras are the actual discourses of the Buddha, the Vinaya are the discourses of the Buddha on the conduct of the monks and nuns and also lay persons, and the Abhidharma is a complex classification of Buddhist concepts.

Reading through the discourses of the Buddha, one discovers that he was followed by thousands arid thousands of monks and some nuns. These ordained individuals wanted to engage in the task of reaching enlightenment without being encumbered by family or worrying about livelihood. The Buddha taught these individuals a set of rules which became the Vinaya so that they could devote their complete energy to reaching enlightenment. The Buddha, however, did not simply one day say that these are the rules for ordained persons. Rather he waited for the proper -situation to arise and would give a teaching on that situation. For example, one day some of his students reported that his monks, who were not allowed to have very many possessions, were raking their begging bowls and making these our of precious woods and embroidering them with precious jewels. The Buddha then gave a short teaching in which he said that monks should not embellish their begging bowls. This went on throughout the Buddha’s lifetime and after the Buddha passed away, all these rules for the sangha were collected together and these were systematize into over 200 rules which came to be known as the Vinaya.

Since this time, the world has changed and there have been occasional calls for changing these rules of the Vinaya.

For example, in Buddha’s day all ordinary persons slept on straw mats on the floor and only kings and wealthy merchants slept on beds. So one of the rules of the Vinaya is that monks and nuns could not sleep in a high bed. Clearly, today when almost everyone sleeps in a bed, this prohibition seems antiquated. Yet, when there has been a call to modernize the Vinaya, the Buddhist has almost always chosen to remain with the original rules of the Vinaya and to interpret these rules in a modified fashion. This interpretation of the rules is not just a practice of convenience, because deciding what is proper and what is improper is always made by highly evolved individuals who follow the criteria carefully laid out by the Buddha for deciding whether an act results in positive or negative karma.

To determine whether an action will produce negative karma it has to meet the four-fold criteria of basis, motivation, action, and final result. For example, for something to create negative karma that comes from stealing (a) the basis is that what is taken belongs to another, (b) the motivation is that one wants to deliberately take it, (c) the actions is that one actually takes it, and (d) the final result is that it is actually taken.

The author of this teaching, Thrangu Rinpoche, is eminently qualified for explaining the Vinaya and Buddhist conduct because he has lived since the age of four in a monastic situation. More recently he had spent seventeen years at Rumtek monastery in Sikkim at his Holiness Karmapa’s monastery teaching the major Tulkus of the Kagyu Lineage of Tibetan Buddhism. Thrangu Rinpoche has maintained the his vows and was asked by Trungpa Rinpoche to become abbot of Gampo Abbey which is one of the few Tibetan monasteries in North America.

In August 1985 Thrangu Rinpoche visited Gampo Abbey for the first time and gave a seminar on monastic discipline. Rinpoche gave the first set of talks to a group of twenty people assembled with Sonam Palden translating.

These eight talks were on the pratimoksha precepts. These were edited by Thelma Habgood published in Number 5 and 6 of The Profound Path of Peace which is the official journal of the International Kagyu Sangha Association Thrangu Rinpoche then gave another series of talks to Gampo Abbey in 1988 and these talks were on the Three Vows. We have combined these talks into one book. The second set of teaching was a set of five talks given at Gampo Abbey in May of 1988 on the three vows and translated by Chojor Radha.

We would like to thank The Profound Path of Peace for publishing these talks and felt that for them to reach a wider audience, Namo Buddha Publications would combine the talks into a single volume. Anyone interested in subscribing in The Profound Path of Peace which will continue to publish talks by Thrangu Rinpoche and other great lamas can write to The Profound Path of Peace, Gampo Abbey, Pleasant Bay, Nova Scotia, Canada BOB 2P0.

Anyone wanting to know more about the activities or the programs or publications of Thrangu Rinpoche should contact the Namo Buddha Seminar, 1390 Kalmia Avenue, Boulder, CO 80304-18 13. Phone: (303) 449-6608.

Content

Forword 3
1. The Pratimoksha Precepts 7
2. Discipline and the Precepts 15
3. The Vow of Individual Liberation 21
4. Karma and the Accumulation of Merit 27
5. The Outer, Inner, and Secret Pratimoksha 35
6. Nine Aspects of a Noble Being 43
7. Three Aspects of the Bodhisattva Vow 49
8. The Five Classes of Vajrayana Precepts 55
9. The Vows of the Three Yanas 63
10. The Vows of the Shravakas 71
11. The Vows of the Bodhisattva 83
12. The Vows of the Vajrayana 93
13. The Samaya Vow 101
14. This is my Monastery 109
15. Glossary of Terms 113
Glossary of Tibetan Terms 125
Bibliography 129
Khenchen Thrangu, Rinpoche 131
Post a Comment
 
Post a Query
For privacy concerns, please view our Privacy Policy
Based on your browsing history
Loading... Please wait

Items Related to The Tibetan Vinaya: Guide to Buddhist Conduct – By The Venerable... (Buddhist | Books)

Manual of Indian Buddhism
Item Code: IDC244
$17.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Life in Ancient India (As Depicted in The Digha-Nikaya): An Old Book
by Dr. Chittaranjan Patra
Hardcover (Edition: 1996)
Punthi Pustak
Item Code: NAJ357
$29.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Social Dimensions of Early Buddhism
Item Code: IDC907
$33.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
A Comparative study Of Bhikkhuni Patimokkha
by Chatsumran Kabil Singh
Hardcover (Edition: 1984)
Chaukhambha Orientalia
Item Code: IDG620
$23.50
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Pali Language and Literature (In Two Volumes)
Deal 20% Off
by Kanai Lal Hazra
Hardcover (Edition: 1994)
D. K. Printworld Pvt. Ltd.
Item Code: IDD144
$135.00$108.00
You save: $27.00 (20%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Origin and Nature of Ancient Indian Buddhism
Item Code: IHJ091
$36.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Guide To Tipitaka
by U Ko Lay
Hardcover (Edition: 1990)
Sri Satguru Publications
Item Code: NAC451
$16.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
The Sutta-Nipata
by P.V. Bapat
Hardcover (Edition: 1990)
Sri Satguru Publications
Item Code: NAJ655
$29.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Testimonials
Thank you guys! I got the book! Your relentless effort to set this order right is much appreciated!!
Utpal, USA
You guys always provide the best customer care. Thank you so much for this.
Devin, USA
On the 4th of January I received the ordered Peacock Bell Lamps in excellent condition. Thank you very much. 
Alexander, Moscow
Gracias por todo, Parvati es preciosa, ya le he recibido.
Joan Carlos, Spain
We received the item in good shape without any damage. It is simply gorgeous. Look forward to more business with you. Thank you.
Sarabjit, USA
Your sculpture is truly beautiful and of inspiring quality!  I wish you continuous great success so that you may always be able to offer such beauty to all people throughout the world! Thank you for caring about your customers as well as the standard of your products.  It is extremely appreciated!! Sending you much love.
Deborah, USA
I’m glad you guys understand my side, well you guys have one of the best international store,  And I will probably continue being pleased costumer Thank you guys so much.
Renato, Brazil
I'm always so appreciative of Exotic India. You have such a terrific website, and great customer service. I wish you all the best, and hope you have a happy new year!
Eric, USA
A Statue was ordered on Dec 22nd and Paid 194.25 including FREE DELIVERY for me as a GIFT for Christmas and they Confirmed that it will be there in 4-5 days but it NEVER arrived till 30th of December and inspite of my various emails they only replied that it is being finished and will be shipped in 24hrs but that was a LIE and no further delivery information was every sent to me. I called and left a message on the phone number listed on their website which is a NY number but no one answered that phone and I left messages but no reply or update on my Statue was sent to me inspite of my daily emails to know the status. I still await this Statue but NO RESPONSIBLE REPLY.
Rita Wason
I got my order today. It was well packed and looks lovely.
Nirmaladevi, USA
Language:
Currency:
All rights reserved. Copyright 2021 © Exotic India