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A Text Book of Dravyaguna Vijnana (Vol - 2)

A Text Book of Dravyaguna Vijnana (Vol - 2)
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Item Code: NAW636
Author: J. L. N. Sastry and Tanuja M. Nesari
Publisher: CHAUKHAMBHA ORIENTALIA, Varanasi
Language: English
Edition: 2018
ISBN: 9789386660879
Pages: 670
Cover: PAPERBACK
Other Details: 9.50 X 7.00 inch
weight of the book: 0.9 kg
About the Author

Dr.J.L.N. Sastry belongs to traditional Ayurveda family from Kakinada (E.G. Dist. Andhra Pradesh). He graduated from Dr. N.R.S. Govt. Ayurvedic College, Vijayawada (A.P.) in June 1989. He was university topper with two gold medals in BAMS. In the same year he topped AP Public Service Commission and joined as Medical officer under AP Govt. He completed PG studies from Dr. B.R.K.R. Govt. Ayurvedic College, Hyderabad in 1998. He received a gold medal and silver medal for his thesis work at both state and national level respectively. In the same year he topped UPSC and joined as Medical officer at CGHS, Chennai.

He is involved with teaching and training in Dravyaguna subject at the following institutes viz...Dr. B.R.K.R. G.A.C., Hyderabad- 1995-99; S.D.A.C. & H., Chandigarh- 2004-07; Ayu College, Dharwad- 2007-09; Ayu College, Tumkur- 2009-11; S.D.A.C. & H., Chandigarh- 2011-12. He had been made as member for the Dravyaguna Syllabus Committee in 2012.

Currently he is designated as Head- Healthcare Research for Dabur Research & Development Centre, Sahibabad, Ghaziabad Dist. U.P. since 2012. He is a member of APC (Ayurvedic Pharmacopoeia Committee), Govt. of India and member of USP (U S Pharmacopoeia) Committee for Herbal Medicines. He is Joint Secretary of AMAM (Association for Manufacturers of Ayurvedic Medicines) and Executive member of ADMA (Ayurvedic Drug Manufacturers Association).

His M.D. (Ayurveda) dissertation was the first HPLC standardization work and his P.D. thesis is the first work on substitutes used in Ayurveda.

His work ‘CARDIAC DISEASES & THEIR MANAGEMENT THROUGH AYURVEDA’ received national award 2009. He received "CHARAK INTERNATIONAL AWARD" from AAPNA association, USA in October 2010. He published more than 15 reference books on Ayurveda. He has presented several clinical and scientific papers at regional, national and international seminars with more than 30 publications in reputed journals and newspapers. He had given several Radio-talks and guest lectures at various prestigious institutes.

About the Senior Author

Dr. Tanjua M. Nesari, has vast experience as professor of Dravyaguna at UG as well as PG level. She did her post-graduation from GAU, Jamnagar in 1982. Her Ph.D. was completed at Pune University under the guidance of Prof. A. P. Deshpande.

She served as Professor/HOD, Dept. of Dravyaguna (UG & PG), Tilak Ayurved Mahavidyalaya, Pune. Later, she acted as Principal of the same institute. Currently, she is Additional Director for Chowdhary Brahma Prakash Charak Ayurved Samsthan, New Delhi.

She is Executive editor of International Journal for research in Ayurved by Department of AYUSH. New Delhi (2009). She is Coordinator for Pharmacovigilance, Peripheral center atTilak Ayurved College. Prof. Tanuja Nesari is invited to conduct lectures on Herbology at SFO, California, USA (2009 & 2010).

She is appointed as alternate leader for developing research collaboration with MAYO clinic. She presented various scientific as well as review papers at various as well as international seminar. She also guided several dissertations and thesis works at P.G. and Ph.D. level.

Foreword

DravyagunaVijnana for the students of Ayurveda (BAMS) is akin to pharmacology for the students of modern medicine (MBBS). The literature review indicate that Ayurveda con-side red quartet in the management of disease viz., Bhishak (physician), Dravya (drug / medicine), Upasthata(assistant) and Rogi(the subject / patient). The importance given to dravya is apparent from the fact that is mentioned next to physician in the chronology.

Ayurveda pharmacology (Dravyaguna) predominantly herbal and the number of herbs have increased from Vedas to Samhitas and from Samhitas to Nighantu period. There are about 100-150 herbs in the Vedic literature (2000 BCE) while about 350-400 herbs were famous duringCaraka Samhita period (500 BCE). These herbs have doubled and total 800-850 herbs are registered by Raj anighantu period (18 ADE).

While the number of herbs has increased, the amount of controversy also increased mainly due to non-availability of herbs for various socio-economic reasons as well as politi-cal reasons. Multiple synonyms also added some confusion / controversy in the identification of herbs. However, the nighantus did try to capture various aspects of each herb and did try to provide the correct identity either using morphological characters, famous use, place of origin etc.

In the 20th century slowly the traditional Gurusishyaparampara has ended and institu-tional training has emerged new way of teaching and training of Ayurveda students. Accordingly, a syllabus was prescribed for each subject (including Dravyaguna) by CCIM since 1976. Initially there were about 124 herbs which were supposed to be taught to students in a detailed manner while another set of 256 herbs which needed just brief introduction to the students. In the last two decades, several committees on Dravyaguna syllabus have revisited and discussed thoroughly before removing some herbs used in Unani and Homoeopathy. At present there are 110 herbs which will be taught in detail while another 128 herbs will be taught in a brief manner.

Knowing the importance of each of these herbs, the authors have carefully studied each one of them. Collected the information from various texts and presented in the form of text for the benefit of the students of Ayurveda in general and Dravyaguna in specific. The subject was dealt along with the references from Vedic and or para-Vedic literature wherever applicable. The classical Vargas and/or ganas were consulted to find out whether the individual herb is part of that group or not. Special effort was made to project each one of the herb in a Non-controversial manner. Detailed discussions were made in case Sala-Sarja-Asvakarna to show the difference. The authors observations on the confusion of ancient texts on Sarjarasa and Salaniryasa as gums from Shorearobusta and Vateriaindica invites scope for further in-vestigation. Similarly, the casual botanical equation of Pluchealaneolata with Rasna is challenged with several examples from the ancient literature / synonyms. In this context one should further study to confirm the famous practice in the South wherein Alpiniacalcarata and Alpiniacalcarata are being used as Dumparashtram / rasnam (?) and Snnarashtram / rasnam (?) respectively.

If carefully studied, each of such discussions will form the base for PG thesis. The observations of the author that the ninghantus have quoted Kutajaphala as Indrayava and Kutajabeeja as Bhadrayava is thought provoking.

The authors have taken pain in referring the scientific literature on these herbs and pro-vided some important study reference to update the students about the modern research on Ayurvedic herbs.

It is good to note that Dr Sastry was author of five volumes Dr J L N Sastry who is the principal author who belongs to a traditional family of Ayurveda had practiced for more than two decades. In between he was also involved in teaching Dravyaguna at various institutes before finally settling with Industrial R&D. He is therefore source of great information and deserves applauds for bringing in this text in a simple as well as complete form. Dr Tanuja Nesari the senior author is known for her academic excellence in the field of Dravyaguna is a renowned teacher. Her inputs into this work has helped in shaping this work as a unique text book for the students of Ayurveda.

I once again congratulate both the authors, who have spared time during busy schedules and completed the text only to help the students of Ayurveda. Finally, the publishers M/s Chaukhambha Orientalia deserves thorough appreciation for publishing this book from their publications.

Preface

It is almost two years after the completion of the first volume of the text book of Dravyaguna Vijananam. The new syllabus of Dravyaguna Vijanana for BAMS students comprises 110 herbs which need detailed knowledge of Basonyms, Synonyms, Regional Name, Botanical Name, Family, Ganaclassification, Habit & habitat, External morphology, Useful parts, Important phytoconstituents, Rasa panchaka, Action on Dosha, Dhatu and Mala, Therapeutic indications, Amayikaprayoga, Matra, Name of important formulations, Adverse effects & remedial measures and Shodhana (as required). There are another 118 herbs which need briefintroduction viz., Sanskrit Name, Botanical Name, Family, Habit, Part used, Rasapanchaka and Indications.

The present volume deals with both 110 herbs as well as 118 herbs in two separate sections. All the aspects needed for Dravyaguna students is covered in a lucid manner. The animal drugs are also covered along with the food items.

The principle author provided the first complete work on Dravyaguna in English in 5 Volumes.Now based on the revised syllabus, the present work is completed with relevant information. This book will help the students in obtaining comprehensive references about the necessary herbs.

The senior author contributed towards the critical assessment of key herbs basis practi-cal experiences with the medicinal herbs. Critical assessment is made based on experience obtained through guiding several P.G. and Ph.D. thesis helped in resolving the controversies.

Over all, the present work is comprehensive and complete will help the students as well as the researchers. The publishers M/s Chaukhambha Orientalia,Varanasi deserve through appreciation for completing this project.

**Contents and Sample Pages**
















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