Subscribe for Newsletters and Discounts
Be the first to receive our thoughtfully written
religious articles and product discounts.
Your interests (Optional)
This will help us make recommendations and send discounts and sale information at times.
By registering, you may receive account related information, our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
.
By subscribing, you will receive our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. All emails will be sent by Exotic India using the email address info@exoticindia.com.

Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
|6
Sign In  |  Sign up
Your Cart (0)
Best Deals
Share our website with your friends.
Email this page to a friend
Books > Hindu > Sanmukhalpam (An Unknown Manuscript of Cauryasastra)
Subscribe to our newsletter and discounts
Sanmukhalpam (An Unknown Manuscript of Cauryasastra)
Pages from the book
Sanmukhalpam (An Unknown Manuscript of Cauryasastra)
Look Inside the Book
Description
Introduction
The word Caurya in Sanskrit means theft. In Prakrta, it is called Coria; in Hindi, it is Cori and in Bengali Curi. The word Caurya is masculine; Curd + a (an) in the sense of despise or Cora + a in the sense of Svartha (denotative sense). This is how the word Caurya is formed.

The synonyms of the word caurah are -coral), steyakarta, dasyuh, taskarah, pratirodhi, malimlucah, stenah, aikagarikah, stainyah, pracchannajanah, mosakah, pataccara, paraskandi, kumbhilah, khanakah, Sarikitavarna, khanika etc. The real meaning of theft is -to usurp things of the owner without his knowledge or consent. Stealing objects in one's presence and denying it afterwards also comes under `theft'. In ancient India, the art of theft was considered as one of the sixty-four kalas i.e. arts. The sage Vatsyayana has designated theft as `hasta-laghavam' and included it in sixty-four kalas in his book `Kamasutra'. In ancient times (probably in 3rd century, A.D.) that is nearly two thousand one hundred years ago, someone known as Marigala, who was master of theft, composed Cauryasastra, a book on art of theft. The language of this text is unintelligible to common readers but easily understandable by thieves. The book is written in coded language, based on Sanskrit, which is used to express secret subject-matter. The distinct script of the text is influenced by Devanagari and to some extent Newari script. The text is narrated by god Sanmukha that is Kartika (the god with six heads and twelve hands holding twelve types of instruments, used for stealing). This book describes all the methods of theft. The only manuscript of this text is available in the Asiatic Society of Kolkata.

Book's Contents and Sample Pages






Sanmukhalpam (An Unknown Manuscript of Cauryasastra)

Item Code:
NAX363
Cover:
HARDCOVER
Edition:
2015
ISBN:
9789383368037
Language:
English
Size:
9.00 X 6.00 inch
Pages:
112
Other Details:
Weight of the Book: 0.26 Kg
Price:
$22.00   Shipping Free
Look Inside the Book
Be the first to rate this product
Add to Wishlist
Send as e-card
Send as free online greeting card
Sanmukhalpam (An Unknown Manuscript of Cauryasastra)
From:
Edit     
You will be informed as and when your card is viewed. Please note that your card will be active in the system for 30 days.

Viewed 434 times since 19th Sep, 2020
Introduction
The word Caurya in Sanskrit means theft. In Prakrta, it is called Coria; in Hindi, it is Cori and in Bengali Curi. The word Caurya is masculine; Curd + a (an) in the sense of despise or Cora + a in the sense of Svartha (denotative sense). This is how the word Caurya is formed.

The synonyms of the word caurah are -coral), steyakarta, dasyuh, taskarah, pratirodhi, malimlucah, stenah, aikagarikah, stainyah, pracchannajanah, mosakah, pataccara, paraskandi, kumbhilah, khanakah, Sarikitavarna, khanika etc. The real meaning of theft is -to usurp things of the owner without his knowledge or consent. Stealing objects in one's presence and denying it afterwards also comes under `theft'. In ancient India, the art of theft was considered as one of the sixty-four kalas i.e. arts. The sage Vatsyayana has designated theft as `hasta-laghavam' and included it in sixty-four kalas in his book `Kamasutra'. In ancient times (probably in 3rd century, A.D.) that is nearly two thousand one hundred years ago, someone known as Marigala, who was master of theft, composed Cauryasastra, a book on art of theft. The language of this text is unintelligible to common readers but easily understandable by thieves. The book is written in coded language, based on Sanskrit, which is used to express secret subject-matter. The distinct script of the text is influenced by Devanagari and to some extent Newari script. The text is narrated by god Sanmukha that is Kartika (the god with six heads and twelve hands holding twelve types of instruments, used for stealing). This book describes all the methods of theft. The only manuscript of this text is available in the Asiatic Society of Kolkata.

Book's Contents and Sample Pages






Post a Comment
 
Post a Query
For privacy concerns, please view our Privacy Policy
Based on your browsing history
Loading... Please wait

Items Related to Sanmukhalpam (An Unknown Manuscript of Cauryasastra) (Hindu | Books)

Papers on Manuscript Editing (An Old and Rare Book in Tamil)
by Annie Thomas
PAPERBACK (Edition: 1997)
Amudha Nilayam, Chennai
Item Code: MZI377
$20.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Descriptive Catalogue of Nyaya Manuscripts
by Sweta Prajapati
HARDCOVER (Edition: 2019)
New Bharatiya Book Corporation
Item Code: NZX849
$62.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Testimonials
Shiva came today.  More wonderful  in person than the images  indicate.  Fast turn around is a bonus. Happy trail to you.
Henry, USA
Namaskaram. Thank you so much for my beautiful Durga Mata who is now present and emanating loving and vibrant energy in my home sweet home and beyond its walls.   High quality statue with intricate detail by design. Carved with love. I love it.   Durga herself lives in all of us.   Sathyam. Shivam. Sundaram.
Rekha, Chicago
People at Exotic India are Very helpful and Supportive. They have superb collection of everything related to INDIA.
Daksha, USA
I just wanted to let you know that the book arrived safely today, very well packaged. Thanks so much for your help. It is exactly what I needed! I will definitely order again from Exotic India with full confidence. Wishing you peace, health, and happiness in the New Year.
Susan, USA
Thank you guys! I got the book! Your relentless effort to set this order right is much appreciated!!
Utpal, USA
You guys always provide the best customer care. Thank you so much for this.
Devin, USA
On the 4th of January I received the ordered Peacock Bell Lamps in excellent condition. Thank you very much. 
Alexander, Moscow
Gracias por todo, Parvati es preciosa, ya le he recibido.
Joan Carlos, Spain
We received the item in good shape without any damage. It is simply gorgeous. Look forward to more business with you. Thank you.
Sarabjit, USA
Your sculpture is truly beautiful and of inspiring quality!  I wish you continuous great success so that you may always be able to offer such beauty to all people throughout the world! Thank you for caring about your customers as well as the standard of your products.  It is extremely appreciated!! Sending you much love.
Deborah, USA
Language:
Currency:
All rights reserved. Copyright 2021 © Exotic India