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Kama Darshan As Perceived by Morari Bapu

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Kama Darshan As Perceived by Morari Bapu
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Kama Darshan As Perceived by Morari Bapu

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Item Code: NAT972
Author: Morari Bapu, Bharati Murthy and Neena Dubey
Publisher: PRABHAT PRAKASHAN
Language: English
Edition: 2018
ISBN: 9789352666393
Pages: 101 (9 B/W Illustrations)
Cover: HARDCOVER
Other Details: 9.00 X 6.00 inch
weight of the book: 0.16 kg
About The Book

This is a book format compilation of the Ram Katha , Manas –Kama Darshana. The aim is to achieve a comprehensive in-depth understanding about Kama. Kama in this context has played a very crucial role. Although man has somewhat succeeded in tapping into this vital energy, he is still seen at large, dancing around to the tunes of this strong emotion.

Morari Bapu in his kathas has often stated, "There is no need to segregate sadhana from life. Rather, the whole life itself should be a sadhana ." He often advises his audience not to worry if vows become weak, but to make sure that our vrittis , propensities remain strong-willed. Bapu maintains that our every action—social work, work of art and learning—should have spirituality as the final goal. This needs to be taken as a way for the next level of human advancement.

Bapu speaks on this vital subject of Kama with compassionate insight, trying to decode its mystery for our benefit. As Bapu says, "The vyasa peeth has to maintain its own grace and refinement." With much sensitivity, this English translation of the katha is presented for the readers—a foray into the realm of human passions.

About The Author

Morari Bapu is a renowned exponent of the Ram Chant Manas and has been reciting Ram Kathas for over fifty years throughout the world. The overall ethos of his Katha is universal peace and spreading the message of truth, love and compassion. While the focal point is the scripture itself, Bapu draws upon examples from other religions and invites people from all faiths to attend the discourses.

Bapu was born on the day of Shivratri in 1946 in the village of Talgajarda, close to Mahuva in Bhavnagar district of Gujarat. The remarkable journey of reciting the Ramayana, which began in the presence of three village folk, has now taken Bapu to all corners of the world. For the over 800 Kathas held to date, Bapu has traversed every major city and pilgrimage in India and travelled to many countries from Sri Lanka, Indonesia, South Africa and Kenya to the United Kingdom, United States, Brazil, Australia, Israel and Japan, drawing millions in audiences.

As well as doing Ram Kathas, Bapu has devoted much of his energy in bringing together communities, religions, sects and castes, in advocating peace and harmony both in India and globally. He also organises marriage ceremonies for Hindu and Muslim girls who are not able to pay for their wedding and participates in Kathas and other functions that are held by Dalits and Devi Puj aks.

At times of calamity in India and abroad, be it the Gujarat earthquake or Bihar floods or nuclear leak in Fukushima, Japan, Bapu has contributed generously to provide aid wherever possible. In his hometown of Talgajarda , Bapu hers. For 16 years now, eminent writers and poets meet , to discuss literary and scholastic issues and developments during the three-day Asmita Parva . The evening classical music programmes bring together renowned vocalists and instrumentalists of India.

Preface

This is a book format compilation of the Ram Katha, Manas-Kana darshan. It took place at Khajuraho in Madhya Pradesh; also included within are elements from Manas-Kama Sutra, recited at Konark, Orissa. The aim is to achieve a comprehensive in-depth understanding about Kama. An urge for advancement and progress is apparently noticeable behind the evolution of human beings from the primitive Homosapiens to the modern man. Kama in this context has played a very crucial role. Although man has somewhat succeeded in tapping into this vital energy, he is still seen at large, dancing around to the tunes of this strong emotion.

Morari Bapu in his kathas has often stated, "There is no need to segregate sadhana from life. Rather, the whole life itself should be a sadhana." He often advises his audience not to worry if vows become weak, but to make sure that our vrittis, propensities remain strong-willed. It's our tendencies which, as an impelling force, drive us to act in a certain manner. Developing pure tendencies is a mammoth effort, often taking lifetimes to cultivate. Bapu maintains that our every action — social work, work of art and learning — should have spirituality as the final goal. This needs to be taken as a way for the next level of human advancement.

Bapu speaks on this vital subject of Kama with compassionate insight, trying to decode its mystery for our benefit. The term darshana refers to seeing and beholding. In the milieu of Hindu philosophy, it means a distinct comprehension and understanding. Darshana is a relative term one perceives and absorbs as per one's cultivation of understanding. A Buddh purusha speaks out for the benefit of all. When the topic is as controversial as human passions, the need for subtle artfulness escalates. As Bapu says, "The vyasa peeth has to maintain its own grace and refinement." With much sensitivity, this English translation of the katha is presented for the readers — a foray into the realm of human passions.

Prologue

Our ancient rishis, from the depth of their pure introspection, gave Kama the status of 'god' and added the suffix `deva' to his name. Therefore, he is called `Kamadeva' in Hindu scriptures. The status of a deity is an indication, a mysterious subtle sign of deeper meaning within Kama — the God of Passions. Seers are credited for having substantial and significant reasons behind their actions and words. The mystery deepens when in Bhagavad Gita, on one hand, Krishna, the Supreme Element has called Kama his vibhuti —outstanding persona and, on the other hand, he is referred to as an enemy of the gyani and vigyani — scholars and the intelligentsia. "Kama is a destroyer of science and knowledge," — saying thus he has been put down. Goswami Tulsidas in the Ramcharitmanas speaks of Kama as khala — a scoundrel, wretched! Nevertheless, he too, commemorates him in the last chapter: Certainly, the great saint had a crucial cause for the same.

The topic of this katha satsanga is such a mysterious Kamadeva, who is condemned but also praised, who is killed but still survives, who is a major vice but still an essential part of our life. We are trying to have a closer look at him and, in doing so, get a better understanding about this naturally born instinct, which influences all, animate or inanimate, the whole existence in varying degrees.

The explicit carvings in the temples of Khajuraho have been a favourite topic of discussion, especially in the Western world. Ironically, the erotic statues, which though amount only for 10 percent of the total architectural art, have come under the maximum negative scanner. Modern educated mind has somewhere missed the very purpose of the art. We have overlooked the deeper reasons of assimilating the intimate life facts with the temple architecture. Essentially, Hinduism has never segregated the two. In fact, Sanatan Dharma puts kama (pleasures) as one of the main aims — purusharthas of human life: dharma, artha, kama and moksha, in that order.

The message in concise is simple, avoid criticising the sculptures without seeing the wider perspective. Refrain from pointing fingers before understanding what they are trying to convey. A word can make wonders, a picture conveys a clear message, but sculpture speaks volumes. These figures are singing a divine song; with our narrow perverted eyes, we could be missing the real message. The stones have undergone a process of endurance, Tapas! Pictures and paintings do not withstand such pain. In carving a figure, the stone has to endure the blows of the sculptor. After much labour and effort, they begin to speak. They speak to us in a mystical language. What is required is the right sight, the pure insight and the drishti to hear s all, their message, which is saying, "I am something else from the outside, but if you look inside, you will get to see the Supreme Ultimate Brahman. Do not stop at the periphery, go deeper — take darshan within.

**Contents and Sample Pages**






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